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(Fan-Made) Sonic CGI design by jarredspekter
(Fan-Made) Sonic CGI design
Yup, still on about this idea XD

Especially given that Guardians of the Galaxy proved that anthro characters can be rendered very nicely indeed (Rocket is the base for this design) I'd love to see someone with ambition try and translate Sonic to the big screen, but using his darker comic book/SATAM storyline as opposed to his more disappointing attempts to merge his mascot nature with some kind of anime inspired plot (such as the infamous Sonic 2006).
Rocket Raccoon is an excellent example of how good a character you can create in a film if you take an original character who might have been a joke or a largely humorous one and treat it with respect and integrity. Rocket was played perfectly. He's funny but not because he has no other personality or purpose, he even has some touching moments.
If Marvel can do it, why not Sega?

I see Sonic as a survivor post a massive takeover of his planet by Dr. Robotnik, wearing the gear he needs for infiltration missions as well as armor elements to defend against his robot foes. He doesn't carry weapons. He doesn't need them since he tends to get in, do what needs doing, and get out before things come to a head. 
The goggles are an idea I saw in a gag comic but I really like, making Sonic's eyes more realistic but also uniting them to the iconic look of Sonic's eyes coming together as a single mass.
Also wearing goggles only makes sense when you run so quickly.
I know Sonic isn't usually shown to wear clothing, but it seems to me to establish the world as potentially cold and inhospitable he should at least throw on some pants and a jacket. 

Elements photoshopped here are of course Rocket Raccoon but also facial elements from Jack Frost (Rise of the Guardians) renders from Wolfenstein the New Order, Brink, Call of Duty, and Tomb Raider (the bandages).
Robotropolis in the background is an edit of Coruscant from Star Wars. 
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I recently heard that Sony is planning on using their projected Sinister Six movie as a 'soft reboot'. That will bring the total number of Spiderman origin stories (not even counting all the remade origin stories in video games and animated shows) to THREE on screen iterations of the same basic storyline.

Clearly reboots, remakes, prequels and sequels are the big selling point for movie making companies nowadays and as long as they stay successful there's no reason to believe anything changing in terms of priorities.

So instead, why can't we at least do something about making these reboots better? 

Reboots/Remakes aren't just singular projects anymore: they're intended to be tentpoles for entire franchises. Even the upcoming Star Wars movie is supposed to be the launching pad for an entirely new series of films, hence why it isn't usually officially called Episode 7.

The problem is all these projects, all these ideas, all these plans amount to nothing if the original film or film series underperforms. We may never get to see Amazing Spiderman 3 or 4 because despite making a profit, Amazing Spiderman 2 was not a resounding financial success and, going by percentages, the lowest grossing Spiderman film ever made. 
If you can make back billions of dollars but your reboot is STILL considered a flop I'd argue something is fundamentally wrong with your strategy, especially when you decide to green light multiple movies to follow your tentpole film before the box office even comes in.

I predict (unless people are incredibly bored and have nothing better to do) that this same progression of high hopes for a franchise dashed by an underperforming tentpole feature film will be the fate of movies like Terminator Genesys.

What is with the current obsession with erasing the past? I get why the Star Trek reboot basically had to insure that it wouldn't just retread the stories that had come before (even though it totally ended up doing just that anyway) and Terminator basically has to change the timeline since there literally is no history without preventing global nuclear war...but why Star Wars? Why is it that J.J has made no bones about the fact his new film not only ignores cannon, but it sidesteps it? Why is it that Dark Horse comics had to discontinue it's expanded universe because the studio basically declared all those characters, all those stories, all those experiences over decades to be irrelevant compared to the new film? 
Imagine if between Harry Potter books or films there was a revelatory event or character that contradicted everything we'd previously known about the franchise. Short of time travel you'd call this a betrayal of a rich history, an established universe, and something fans had invested a lot of emotional meaning into.
But a TON of movies try to make the 'reboot' all but a declaration that what came before is now meaningless. 
This is especially true of the prequel or sequel nowadays which is odd since these stories supposed FOLLOW from pre-established material. But the tone, the characters, the events of a lot of these new films seem to blithely ignore things that were made perfectly clear or change dramatically to suit whatever the mood is of the current handlers. 
The real reason for ignoring what came before seems to be so the writers/directors can lazily repeat elements of the originals for the sake of empty nostalgia. If you pretend The Lord of the Rings didn't exist maybe the dumber decisions in The Hobbit might make some sense, but in context they're just cloning moments of the previous trilogy with special effects to mask the patch job.
The hypocrisy of all this comes in because these franchises ARE NOT departing from their previous progenitors at all. Without the original Robocop half of the new Robocop movie makes no sense because it's basically a grab-bag of rehashed scenes and ideas. Jokes and callbacks in a lot of movies make no sense because without the context of a series they aren't even related to logic, and reason falls apart.



At a certain point references go from cute to being obnoxious reminders of what COULD be...if they weren't just one off jokes.  Look at all these characters that don't make any sense in context or represent characters and events that you'll probably never get to see on screen!
Yay...? 

Basically the modern reboot labors under a contradiction: an attempt to pull away from the past, but also rip-off the past anyway because those movies were the ones people actually seemed to like.

So how does one make a reboot/remake that people might want to see with more than grudging enthusiasm?

You know what everyone remembers from all of these productions people keep trying to reboot/remake?
The characters.
The problem is that people like these characters I would argue in toto; not just the protagonist because he's played by a (by now) famous actor. Making a younger version of the protagonist doesn't much change the focus of the story, and if you don't do something to distinguish your reboot from the original you can rapidly come across as an inferior immitation (which is what a lot of reboots seem like).

To shake this stigma I suggest the concept of focusing on a character normally left unexplored. I don't mean just have them on screen more often, I mean honestly look into where they came from, how they came to think they way they do and perhaps even what they did before they came into association with the more commonly known main character.
A character used only for exposition or with an utterly detached and meaningless backstory can just be irritating, but it can also be genuinely compelling to look into the history and personality of a seemingly ancillary person who still plays an important role.
This is why the Sherlock Holmes movie (and shows like Sherlock) focused primarily on Watson because although Sherlock is more eccentric and exciting, Watson is more relatable and by comparing him with his friend you realize how off kilter Holmes really is much more effectively than if the film spent most its time with Holmes. Watson is investigated to a certain degree in the original novels, but was never quite the main character so shifting the focus I think made those reboots much more grounded and managed to distinguish them from the decades of portrayals of Sherlock Holmes in the past (which tended to use Watson as just a side kick or comic foil.)

The same could be done with a failed reboot (I'm talking failed in terms of critical reception) like Transformers. Optimus Prime is a potentially interesting character but for the most part although he's competent he's not exactly understandable because of his larger than life heroism and might. Sam Witwikie was intended to be an audience proxy but he comes across as useless and annoying, like so many of the human characters in Transformers who exist just to advance meaningless side plots and tell unfunny jokes.
So? Shift the focus to another transformer!
Lets see the spotlight fall on someone like Ratchet, the autobot medic of the group who almost fades into the background during the films. The other autobots for the most part have been relegated to stereotypes but in addition to making them less formulaic (and in Jazz's case borderline offensive), consider moving the point of view character from pointless Sam to the potentially more interesting robot character who may have similar human-like qualities but he has the advantage of actively being engaged in the main narrative surrounding the robots as opposed to standing in the wings and screaming at people. 
Not everyone cares about Sam or the evil government agents or his continually changing girlfriend. Everyone wanted to see Transformers in a movie called Transformers, so lets make the movie about a Transformer!
In my imagination Ratchet could be torn in his loyalties perhaps (since the war on Cybertron was a civil one) and although not a straight up combatant for the most part he could still do his part for his brothers in the heat of battle. Perhaps there could even be a theme of his position outside of the thick of warfare leading to his attachment with humans that even Optimus cannot focus on when he's dueling Decepticons the size of office buildings. Ratchet could be the bridging character between the autobots and the humans they are supposedly defending: the character everyone wanted to see if humans had to be involved in the story in the first place!

I might not see a movie about the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles AGAIN, but I'd be inclined to see a movie on the origins of Splinter who is established in the comics but there's plenty of wiggle room as to his previous exploits, his formative adventures.
Lets see a Spiderman movie that shifts focus to someone like Black Cat for awhile, not leaving out Spidey but weaving a yarn that associates both characters as equal partners in crime fighting perhaps. A Black Cat movie was rumored but if it turned out anything like the X-Men one-off movies of The Marvel movies like Thor and Captain America it would just be an ultimately purposeless distraction.
I'd prefer to see a movie about a side character that enriched the narrative of the main series rather than confused or contradicted it.

Instead of rebooting 'Judgement Day in Terminator', how about instead we see a tightly made movie about Kyle Reece during his days as a soldier in the resistance? We're sick of John Connor and Sarah already!

How about a Star Wars movie focusing on someone who isn't immediately involved in the same old Light Side vs Dark Side conflict? Maybe a smuggler having adventures or a soldier or a regular person who proves themselves after being caught up in events beyond their usual lives? 
How about a story from the perspective of the villains?

How about a Jurassic Park movie set in a world invaded by the dinosaurs instead of another bloody theme park that inevitable gets destroyed?

If you MUST do a reboot/remake sequel/prequel lets see something new, not just the warmed over scraps of better movies you're serving on a shiny platter. Lets see characters we didn't think we'd see, go places we never thought possible, look at the events of a tale sideways rather than from the same perspective again and again?

Every movie, every story, is a world. You can look outside the lines of the screen if you dare to, and that's where you find events, characters, ideas to freshen your franchise I believe.

Another suggestion...
If you're going to reboot something REBOOT IT!

In the early days of comics before we got stuck in such a rut as we have now people would bend over backwards to come up with new in order to justify bringing back a property or making another parallel story to go with it.
You couldn't just have 'spiderman 2.0' because that would be cheating and people wouldn't buy two comics to follow two stories that weren't all that different.
So instead you had to get fancy.

There are Elseworlds stories in which events occurred differently in the histories or futures of superhero characters and suddenly their entire universes change. Batman becomes a private eye with all his villains as relatively ordinary people but with strange defects like in Dick Tracy. Other series like Red Son sees Superman landing in Russia and becoming the champion of communism with Lex Luther becoming an American president standing against his plans of conquering the world along with a terrorist version of Batman. The Nail series follows the concept of what would happen if a nail burst the tires of Martha and Jonathan Kent so they never managed to discover Superman's crashed space pod, leading to an entire alternate future in which new super heroes rose to take his place but new villains also and the world was put on the brink of destruction.
One series has the super heroes in a world following a nuclear war. Others had zombie super heroes, Batman in victorian times...etc.

These realize that just because you have established characters you want to use doesn't mean you have to CONSTANTLY repeat the same completely rote origin stories again and again. 
Amazing Spiderman I found incredibly dull at times because half of it is telling the same story we already knew with no appreciable changes. Peter is bitten by a magic science spider. WE KNOW. He makes his own web shooters in the reboot but this never comes up in the plot anyway.

We need something different.

Marvel got this too with series like the 2020 line portraying heroes like Spiderman in the far future. Batman Beyond was in a similar vein, proving that just because your heroes age doesn't mean young bucks can't take up the mantle and add their own touches to the legend.

So instead of JUST REPEATING the same origin story again but with slight alterations, give us something new. Unless you're adapting something and if you've decided to reboot it, give us something the past couldn't deliver.

Make Robocop in some way different this time round than his previous nature, and that doesn't just mean giving him a black paint job. 
Make Spiderman 2020 and throw Parker's ancestor into whatever trouble you wanted to involve him in in what might have just been another forgettable modern day Spiderman storyline. Sinister Six in the future? Yes please!

The reboot/remake is going to make it's own changes anyway. You cannot claim to both be faithful to the original and ignore it, so if you're going to be a new property PROVE IT. Don't ride on the coattails of the past if you're going to insult your lineage or have nothing better to prove. 

Lets see a movie I can get excited about instead of just more of the same with a fancy graphical upgrade. I don't care to sit through a movie about a Jurassic Park I've already been to if it's just going to be beat by beat the same movie I've seen before and done better decades ago.

Try and make a THEME. Try and give us characters we like either because you understood why the characters were good in the first place or you made up new ones that have depth and their own personalities. 

Reboots are here to stay it seems.  

Maybe we should start trying to do them right.
Positives first...

(Might be light spoilers)

The Battle of Five Armies has some of the most impressive CGI/practical fantasy effects I've ever seen. The armor, the locations, the clothing, the props...all excellently and believably crafted. The acting is fine. The music is fine. The directing, the choreography, some of the choices made that were not in line with the book were still logical and intelligent (such as the men of Laketown arming themselves with the weapons of ruined Dale and dwarves fighting in a shield phalanx.)

But for every decent idea, great set, awesome effect or exciting battle there was strung throughout this really disconcerting trend of either not trusting the audience to get subtlety or having no sense of restraint. Nothing in this film with very few exceptions was just allowed to function. A battle wasn't a battle until it was WAY too complicated. Single combat isn't enough it needs to take place on a collapsing bridge formed of a tower propped between a cliff! People can't just die, they hang on for seemingly minutes until their tears dry on their faces and the breath finally leave their bodies (villains included). People can't just talk they SHOUT EVERYTHING! Jokes can't be funny without WILD SLAPSTICK! Dream sequences are like echo chambers of endlessly repeating plot dialogue. Orcs had really stupid looking prosthetic arms and legs made out of weapons. The leader dwarf talks straight like a native born Scottish man down to calling his enemies 'Bastards'. 
There's a reference to corsets and crossdressing for comic relief.
THERE ARE ENDLESS callbacks to the original trilogy from repeated dialogue to shoe-horned in scenes to reference later events (sometimes to no sense at all) to characters appearing for glorified cameos.

And the new elf character? Not important to anything. Literally nothing. No arc, no story, no conclusion. She might as well have been written out or just replaced by Legolas who did everything for her (and oftentimes for the dwarves) anyway despite having nothing to do with the original book.

All told it left me impressed, but a little bit sad. It all concluded like more of a studio mandated continuation rather than a prequel series because anyone watching these films before the originals won't understand them that well they're so closely tied together. Characters appear without fanfare that only make sense in the context of the original trilogy and the same goes for events that go unexplained and frankly annoying reiterations of classic scenes and lines of dialogue that have no logic in The Hobbit and just serve to remind you of The Lord of the Rings.

All that political correctness started annoying me too after the sixtieth time a women showed her vocal independent defiance because they were surely always considered equal to men as warriors, not to mention the bizarre and ungodly boring subplots about evil rich people who are evil...because they're rich.

And Lord of the Rings is still a better trilogy. Better characters. Better story. Better pacing. Better action. I'd even argue better special effects. There's surprisingly one or two instances in Five Armies where the CGI looked so terrible it must have been someone cutting corners, made last minute, or no one quality controlled this production at all. 

And the entire Hobbit trilogy is drenched in this weird oversaturated light which makes even real actors and objects at times look fake and cheap. It's not a good look. At worst it makes the entire move look like a video game cut scene.

The Hobbit I think is destined to be forgotten. If it didn't exist we wouldn't lose anything except for some really nice artwork by technicians, engineers, armorers, and set decorators. It adds nothing to the series, but thankfully it takes away nothing either. 

When I finished the original trilogy I went back and watched them again in the theaters, but The Hobbit is so irritatingly trite and PAINFULLY long (Five Armies just never seemed to end) that I have no desire to see any of these movies again. 

It's sad because Martin Freeman did a great job and so did everyone else but the extraneous characters, stupid additions, endless cartoony action scenes, rehashed ideas, and really out of place writing to top everything else made it all collapse into a pale reflection of its former glory.  

Jackson elevated the fantasy film to it's heights, but it seems like he's more concerned now about given his actor friends work and 'cool' scenes to play out and provide more work for technician and prop-designer friends. 

Hopefully someone will take up the torch and remind us all why LOTR was more than just another fantasy series.
There are so many stories, so many lost gems of fiction that drift in the ether criminally unknown. It's impossible for this not to be the case because of how many cultures and how many artists make their works in so many different genres and styles and mediums. Film I still consider one of the most interesting in terms of how many people need to collaborate to bring it about, the options it has to tell a story in such a vivid and immediate way, the communal aspect of sharing those stories, and the way that art form has shaped our society, our dreams. 

So because of that naturally everyone would like something they enjoyed to be brought to life on the silver screen: great actors taking the roles of their favorite characters, digital effects used to breath vitality into their favorite moments. 

But films are driven oftentimes (especially the massive budgeted ones) by an unfortunately combination of favoritism, current popularity, and nepotism. If you don't know the right people you may never see that big debut and if you aren't a New York Times best seller no major studio will concept to fork over several billion dollars to realize your story theatrically.

But that's what dreams are for! Awhile back a Lord of the Rings or Hobbit blockbuster seemed like something never to be so stranger things have happened. But in order to realize something in a respectful way more people need to know about it and why it, at least according to me, deserves a movie debut. 

So here's six stories from various mediums I feel would make terrific films if treated right, but which will probably not for now see that big movie to showcase them because of obscurity or age. 
I'm still crossing my fingers and I hope I can convince you why these could make very entertaining films :D

I'm leaving the obvious stories like Bioshock, Halo, and American McGee's Alice out. Chances are a little too good some studio will eventually crank out some subpar movie to take advantage of the fandom eventually (like Max Payne sadly...)

I'd love to see these taken over by someone who could bring them about with respect and with imagination!

1: ROGUE TROOPER


Based on the comic book series which was also made into an excellent (and criminally ignored) video game, this was set in the same AD 2000 universe that was inhabited by Judge Dredd among others. Rouge Trooper's story concerns the titular character: a Genetic Infantryman (or G.I) who along with his cloned brothers fights for the Souther cause on Nu Earth against the fascistic Nord federation. He has been built for this purpose: superior in strength to a human, capable of operating any weapon with equal skill, and most importantly able to breathe the poisonous atmosphere of Nu Earth without the need for a breathing apparatus that all of his Souther allies and Nord enemies need to survive. After decades of conflict with biological weapons the planet's surface has been turned into an uninhabitable toxic wasteland, the seas an acidic chemical soup. But the war goes on for one purpose: the worm hole near the planet which allows any side controlling it to instantaneously transport their ships anywhere in the galaxy.
Another unique feature of Rogue and the most immediately noticeable: he's bright blue.
G.Is like to say they never leave battle even on death, and this is literally true. Once a G.I is mortally wounded their memories and abilities are recorded onto data chips that other G.Is can then install on their weapons and gear.
Rogue is one of the first alongside several hundred other G.Is to be actually deployed against Nord placements and it seems like a foolproof plan...until someone high up in Souther command betrays the G.Is and most of them are slaughtered in an ambush, the rest including Rogue driven into fighting and hiding from the superior numbers of their enemy. Rouge's entire team is wiped out, but he gets to their data chips and installs them into his gun, his helmet, and his backpack. Now he's literally a one man army.
Rogue Trooper, the comic and the game, were a creativity buffet of weird and wild ideas without borders. There are tanks the size of cities called Blackmares, there's living barb wire, mutant camel/alpaca crossbreeds called Stamels, insects that have evolved into cyborg creatures to eat the discarded weapons across the battlefield. The Souther and the Nord have been fighting so long both of their cultures have become inured to the carnage, developing hideous weapons and worse 'enhancements' for their respective troops. But Rogue is in an unique position. He's still dedicated to his cause, but now he has a new mission to accomplish in addition to thwarting The Nord...find out who betrayed his fellows and why.
In a film Rogue would be accompanied by his data chips in his clothing and weapons that can speak to him telepathically, sometimes taunting him or suggesting their own courses of action. These fallen fellows each have their own personalities, their own function (since now they govern his gear and even provide Rogue with special abilities thanks to them being installed) and they can even be a sort of conscience to Rogue who can become so embroiled in his fighting he forgets the cost of war. Rogue and his fellow G.Is aren't robots, and experience among the survivors of the battles away from the fighting even gets him to experience new things he wouldn't have if the original offensive had gone off without a hitch.
I think it would be an extravagant, wildly vivid and inventive sci-fi action film with possibilities for innumerable sequels as even after Rogue finds the traitor he still has an entire war to fight. 
It probably won't ever be, but I did like what they did with Dredd. Maybe those guys could remember the other members of the AD 2000 family and the opportunities for new and interesting stories to tell they present?

2: FALLOUT


This is dying to see a cinematic adaptation.
The idea of a post apocalyptic story has happened over and over again, but Fallout has the unique concept present of making that post apocalypse a society in it's own right. This isn't Mad Max where everything is gone except for the crazies in cars and the few survivors in scattered cities. Fallout has entire societies, factions, even towns and underground cities. There's plenty of wasteland but mankind and mutant kind endures regardless.
And that's where the stories come in. The factions are in contention. People are trying to bring back the glory days while others are trying just to stay out of the limelight and live as best they can. There's stories to be told in the bunkers, in the deserts where tribes still exist, in the cities where crime and politics and commerce converge.
Its a unique aesthetic too: a futuristic look by way of the 1950s with the mascot of the new world, PipBoy, a perpetually grinning figure of optimism despite the wide scale death and destruction. This and the haunting music from a bygone era makes the whole have this uneasy but compelling feel of darkly humorous irony, that the world was so convinced before the bombs fell and now all that remains is the brightly colored husks of that naiveté.  
The first and second and third games are movie plots in themselves: plenty of characters and moral dilemmas and twists to go around. If someone wanted to be daring they could even tell a new story with a new character from another bunker.
There's plenty of room out there...

3: FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE

Tell me this doesn't look like a movie trailer...


A comic trilogy written by video game creator Michael Mendheim (Mutant League Football) and legend Simon Bisley (Heavy Metal FAAK2) this is a movie in three graphic novels. You could film this and it would work perfectly the way it's paced, the way each chapter follows the same rules as a film with rising action, characters investigated, plot twists, and a satisfying conclusion which still leaves things open for further stories.
Adam is one of the last of the bloodline of Solomon: THE Solomon from The Bible. Like a very few he has been given two of the seven seals described in the Book of Revelation which when broken will unleash the Four Horsemen: Pestilence, War, Famine and Death. When his family is killed by Hell's followers after a demon decides to begin breaking the seals, Adam is told by an angel to become a Helldiver in search of three other people destined to stand with him against The Four should the seals be destroyed.
Unfortunately these other three are dead and in Hell, so Adam has to commit the sin of suicide to find them, and together with them and an army of repentant damned face off against The Four and their minions to rescue the Earth from an early apocolypse.
Hell in this series is very interesting. It's all drawn in Bisley's highly detailed and hyper-realized fashion, but it's portrayed as being different from everyone who is sent there. Hell was once Gehenna, a place where angels used to punish sinners but only to teach them the errors of their ways. Rebel angels turned it into the place of eternal torment, so Adam travels through not only rivers of fire and monstrous demons, but also a young starlet's twisted memories of being a prostitute, a senator's hellish office where devils offer him wealth and power while the souls of those he wrong stalk him, and the eternal execution for murder of a priest driven to madness after he lost his faith.
It's VERY stylized and a little excessive, but in a deliberate way. Adam wields two swords and akimbo pistols, has a rocker's long hair cut and wears a black jacket. It might seem silly and contrived but it's intentionally and unapologetically classic in it's portrayal of a badass hero against equally badass enemies. The Horsemen have received an upgrade too with War carrying a chain gun, Death wielding dark magic, Pestilence shifting between a hideous gorgon and a seductive young woman, and Famine resembling a demonic circus performer with a ringmaster's costume and a crooked top hat above a rotting skull; cackling dark jokes. If you want to see demonic tripods and airships versus repentant Nazi stormtroopers, crusader nights, and mongol hordes led by an assault rifle wielding Cain...what other book can you really look to?
On top of all this fun there are some really surprisingly deep questions about religion, about free will, and about the choices we make. Each horsemen for instance is a dark mirror of one of the four chosen, including Death being a mirror of Adam. In the end there's even a bit of a bittersweet conclusion with loss as well as redemption.
Definitely worth you consideration and, with an admittedly hefty budget, this could be a trilogy that made every blockbuster in the past few years look tame by comparison.
Tell me you wouldn't see a movie featuring a tattooed muscle-bound redneck priest stabbing the horsemen of War through the chest with a flag he'd broken off from the top the White House?
THIS HAPPENS! 

4: DIABLO


The second game is great, but the first has inarguably the best atmosphere I've seen from this series as well as games in general I'd even argue.
When I think of gothic horror I think of this game: ruined towns, rumors, nightmares, a church with a spiraling pit into Hell itself below. This game downplayed the fantasy in favor of the horrific notion of enemies too powerful to truly ever destroy. You might prevail against a handful of hopping imps, but the larger ones were to be run from, not faced toe to toe. Diablo himself before he even appears as a boss is established as a cunning enemy, turning the hearts of people by manipulating their fears and paranoia. 
In the end he even leads the player character to defeat despite his death.
Diablo is in a unique position to be film because the sequel, Diablo 2, has enemy characters who are (almost certainly) analogues of the original player characters from the first Diablo game. In cannon the Warrior character becomes possessed by Diablo, the rogue character is the mini-boss BloodRaven, and the wizard becomes Horizon the Mad. 
Imagine a film in which we got to know people, their failings and virtues, and in the end they were destroyed by the very evil they sought to confront! A downer? Well, yes. That's what GOTHIC HORROR is about!
I think it would be fascinating to have a frightening, atmospheric, action packed but character centric 'fantasy' film which had the guts to end in a way so few genre productions do.
Tragically.
Is it without any hope of chance of redemption for goodness? No because in the sequel evil will be defeated.
But in the original we get to see that evil isn't always so easy to see right from the off, and sometimes the best intentions can literally be the road to Hell...

5: BONE


Bone the comic needs a proper adaptation. The games were hampered by a severely low budget, but they did prove the style of the comics and the dialogue might work in CGI.
The Bone series by Jeff Smith is an anomaly: a seemingly impossible union of Loony Tunes and Lord of the Rings.
Where as the titular Bone characters are very definitely comic and even literally cartoony in their antics, surrounding there story of being kicked out of their hometown because of a misadventure is another story which develops in such a way if you started later into the series you'd hardly believe that later books were from the same franchise at all.
In Out from Boneville you see the prime protagonist Phony Bone meet with talking bugs and a cigarette smoking dragon.
In later chapters like The Crown of Horns there is a massive war between the creatures of darkness, a fanatical order of magical swordsmen, and a resurrected maddened goddess threatening to destroy all reality unless the chosen heir to the kingdom rediscovers her birthright. 
Somehow this juxtaposition works. In the same series where there's a cow race entered by one of the Bones dressed up as a cow so he can pay off a bar tab, there's also tragic loss, epic sieges, living dreams, and the spiritual history of the world revealed in which guardian dragons help a warrior princess to heal the past and save the future.  
This could either be CGI or actually live action with only key characters in CGI such as the Bones. Thorn and her grandmother are human as well as many other characters and despite looking somewhat stylized they aren't impossible to portray with actual actors.
If we're in the era of grand trilogies and quadrilogies, maybe it's high time for a story that combines humor with fantasy and adventure all wrapped up in a very sweet ongoing tale about both unrequited love and the trials and tribulations of friends.

6: ELFQUEST



A product of the seventies but somehow timeless in it's influence and ambition, this was the series that let me know that graphic novels weren't just Sunday funnies and superheroes. The series that follows the adventures of a tribe of elves had a fleshed out backstory (with it's own mythology), multiple races involved in various types of contention, multiple races of elves themselves with their own cultures, monstrous creatures, intrigue, romance, battle, great characters...it's all here!
You cannot believe the density of this universe and how easily it all seems to work. The way it's portrayed you could almost believe that Elfquest from the first book on was a remake of something earlier since all of it ties so smoothly together from the history to the fantasy elements that are fascinating and just on the side of believable (like elves have a special 'true name' and communicating with other elves and their mounts by 'sending' which can even be used as a weapon!)
Little people don't get a chance like this very often: an entire saga built around moderately sized characters. The makeup and effects technicians would have a field day from the rock-shaper wizards who can meld stone to their wishes to the Flier tribe (one of which has bat wings) to the grotesque but somewhat civilized trolls, to the fact that the elves ride to and fro on the backs of wolves, elk, and even sea creatures. 
Fire and Flight is the first story and features the Wolfrider tribe escaping their home forest after primitive humans burn it down. Without a place to live they try at first living with the trolls until that goes rapidly into dangerous territory so instead they settle in the desert-like sun lands where the Sun elves live. But their journeys are through with some of the elves becoming rivals for affection against other Sun elves, the Fliers arriving with secrets to the history of the elves, more encounters with humans and trolls...adventures are endless in their possibility and the only reason the stories stopped was because the husband and wife team retired!
The authors have tried writing screenplays and making deals with movie companies but nothing has come about yet.
Perhaps now with all out fancy technology for movies like The Hobbit, Elf Quest might finally see new life on the screen?
A request by :iconsonicrocks57:

I haven't been watching that much television (pretty much ever in my life actually) so I had to make an allowance for other types of media to make this list at all as opposed to exclusively television Christmas specials.
I tried to stay away from anything too obvious for variety's sake. 

In no particular order!

1: The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus by L. Frank Baum

This exists: a story of the birth, youth, and old age of Santa Claus written by the author of The Wizard of Oz. 
He's raised by a lioness and a wood nymph, goes to battle against an army of dragons and demons...and that's all before the secrets are revealed about his name, where he got the idea to make toys in the first place, how he gets all around the world (and why he's immortal) and where our traditions of the Santa Claus festival really come from (for example: the christmas tree was invented when Santa needed to deliver presents to a family without a chimney and left presents in the branches of one according to this version of events). 
It's got plenty of Baum-isms (the invisible foes of Santa are called the Awgwas and there are also the Goozles-Goblins and one of The Claus' friends is called Peter the Knook) that fans of Oz will recall and it's an interesting reboot of a sorts for the Claus festival as a singular entity: sort of like Rise of the Guardians but with very few instances of something occurring without a thoughtful explanation. 
It's an odd story to be sure but it's complete in scope, explores somber and joyful themes alike, gives depths to a cultural mythos, and it even has a (short) sequel in which Santa is kidnapped and his appointed deputies have to take up his mantle to rescue him. Apparently Rankin Bass made a stop motion movie based on this story but I've never seen it. This is one of those books I'd almost prefer to not see the movie based on it so I can keep my own personal visions in my head about it's characters, settings, and bizarre concepts. 

2: The Lost Christmas Eve by Trans-Siberian Orchestra 


Part three of a MASSIVE Christmas themed rock-opera, this is a joyful and exciting compilation of original compositions and more modern adaptations of traditional classics. It all revolves around a plot fleshed out in pieces of narration before each song that furthers the story. Even without the story thought this is prime material if you want to set the stage for Christmas celebration/party that you'd like to keep upbeat and energetic. This album especially has some of the best renditions of yuletide favorites and the original songs are strangely at home among these. Sometimes the songs are combinations of Christmas songs either as instrumentals or with new lyrics.
All in all it's great compositions, spirited singing, a unique tale to tell...and sweet guitar licks bro! :headbang:
Who could ask for more?

3: The Polar Express 

Here's an oddity. NONE of the songs in the movie I like. The acting is really hokey, the animation (especially on the characters) can be downright uncanny/scary and the plot, like the book, isn't all that defined or ultimately satisfying. It boils down to a child having a strange dream-like trip to Santa Claus' workshop.
And on that level it's AMAZING.
When there isn't singing or creepy dead-eyed children on screen, this is a gorgeous production. The imagination and sheer scope of these sequences is a wonder to behold in 3D or without and it is inarguably the grandest and yet most nearly believable representation of that mythical workshop in the North Pole. The scenes of the train are like living oil paintings. The endless tracts of snow look treacherous and deep, enveloping the warmth of the cabin of the train and later Santa's Workshop itself in this slightly dark and even menacing environment that makes all the colors and cheer the brighter. 
There's a scene (I'm not sure if I can remember it paying off) in which our hero meets with a mysterious man living like a hobo on top of the titular Polar Express. Some people have postulated what he represents (he's not in the book that I recall) and if he didn't eventually come back what he served to do was create one more bizarre element that made the film all the more surreal. Despite all the cheesy songs and out of place dance sequences, the sense of weirdness made the magical elements more believable, and the ever present darkness made it feel so much like one of my dreams I could relate no matter how crazy things became.
Worth seeing if you want to see what might have happened to an animated Christmas special...if the animator suddenly got an inexplicable interest in arctic landscapes, obscure philosophical references (the hobo is lit by firelight and seems to enjoy testing the children's faith) and perhaps drew from their fever dreams after drinking way too much eggnog.

4: Batman Returns


It takes place on Christmas. Kinda. Sometimes.
Whatever. I like this one.
This theme especially keeps making me think of Christmas...for some reason.
At least it makes me think of snow.

5: Rare Exports The Movie


One of the best (perhaps only) movies I've seen that sucessful translated a concept from a web series into a film.
Rare Exports is based on a short film with one joke: what if Finnish hunted Father Christmases?
It's a strange little movie featuring hunters stalking a naked, bearded man and tranquilizing him to be sent away as a 'rare export' to other countries to serve as a super market santa.
How do you make that into a movie?
They found a way, and it is WEIRD. 
Forget everything you know about Santa Claus. This movie reinvents the myth from the ground up and treats it all with a masterful mix of horror and humor. The jokes spread not from the fact that Santa is real and that he is a silly, strange thing to deal with...they come from our beleaguered team of Finnish hunters discovering that Santa is real, he's pissed...and he's deadly. 
Imagine Evil Dead meets Duck Dynasty meets Miracle on 34th Street.
It's unique, it's beautifully shot (every single moment of it looks epic), the acting is fantastic, and it leaves you wondering how they managed to pull off something so utterly ridiculous with such a somber face. 
This movie takes itself deadly seriously...and I wouldn't have it any other way :)

6: The Church Mice at Christmas by Graham Oakley

Utterly delightful: this illustrated book has been a part of my Christmas since I can remember.
It's a very British portrayal of a family of mice (hundreds of them) and their pet cat Samson living in the basement of a church which they do their best to take care of to earn their room and board. These are good Christian mice so they feel indebted to their fellow man (or mice), and it's just this concern that leads into their latest adventure. The mice want to hold a Christmas party for all of their brethren but in order to do this they need funds to buy all the necessities. The first proposition is to ask Santa for the things needed but some savvier mice who know St. Nick isn't real decide to set forth onto the streets of London to search for treats and the means to simulate a visitation by Santa Claus. 
Misadventures follow (including arrests), the mice and Samson have a couple of close scrapes and all seems lost...but in the end none other than Santa Claus seems to walk through the doors of the church after all!
Or does he?
Excellent books for kids and the young at heart. The erudite and constantly bickering mice (especially the know-it-all School Mouse) is hilarious and complimented by the subtle jokes hidden in the illustrations themselves such as the rector of the church surrounded by beautiful works of holy art...but he's watching some kind of slasher movie on his television set.
A great read aloud or to yourself Christmas treat, and it's only one of several adventures for the characters! 

7: Snowed in at the House of Mouse


This is the world's greatest clip-show. Ever. Full stop.
This was literally a show based on re-airing old cartoons and recycling all of the classic Disney heroes and villains as background characters for a frame story involving Mickey owning a club...and it's still heartwarming and fun to see over and over again for me.
A lot of people in the position to replay their work will put little effort into making it a special occasion. You've already seen what they have to show you or it's old so therefore why bother to imply it means anything?
But House of Mouse surrounded it's classic cartoon lineup and shorts collections with vignettes starring Disney characters (for the most part) voiced by their original actors and all interacting in some pretty creative ways. 
My favorite reoccurring character (beyond of course of the core team of Mickey, Donald, Goofy, Minnie and Pluto) was Gaston who always prefaced whatever any other character said by interjecting his own name.
'No one orders the special like Gaston!'
These characters could also be seen at the time on other Disney animated shows so sometimes there was crossovers inside of the House of Mouse, especially concerning Timon and Pumba and Hercules. 
All in all classic cartoon fun surrounded by well animated and affectionate tribute to decades of entertainment and magic.

8: MST3K 'The Santa Claus Movie'


You will thank me if you take some time this Christmas to catch this episode in it's entirety.
Mystery Science Theater 3000 was one of those shows I never saw a bad episode for and which had no filler. Every single scene, be it riffing the film of the day or doing skits with Joel (or later Mike) and their robot pals was pure comedy gold. 
For those who don't know the show (in which case, welcome and enjoy!) Mystery Science Theater 3000 was about a hapless janitor working for a mad scientist who one day trapped the guy on a satellite (the SOL or Satellite of Love) and forced him to watch terrible movies, hoping that one day he'd be driven insane allowing them to...rule the world (never made that clear how, but the show itself never takes the premise that seriously). To keep his sanity however the janitor builds robots to join him in making fun of the terrible movies he must sit through, these being Tom Servo, Crow T. Robot, Cambot (literally the camera) and Gypsy the pilot.
All this is an excuse to watch great comedians making jokes at the expense of films that are either cheesy, poorly made, confusingly written, badly realized, or just plain so odd that it's hard to tell what the creators were thinking.
'Santa Claus' is that latter kind of movie: a Mexican production featuring Santa fighting with a devil named Pitch aided by Merlin the Magician, mechanical reindeer, a flower which makes him invisible...
Tell you what, watch the movie. It's the whole film (complete with commentary and skits) and the jokes might be great but some things that happen in the movie itself have to be seen to be believed.

9: A Child's Christmas in Wales Dylan Thomas 

Did you ever want to see what would happen if that movie A Christmas Story (the one with the kid who wants a rifle for Christmas) was written by an English poet?
Maybe not, but that's basically what this is: the memories of a precautions child in the days leading up to Christmas complete with daydreaming, pranks on the townsfolk, misadventures, overwhelming desire for presents, and ultimately the comfort of family and the magic of the season.
Here's an example of the strange medley of beauty, innocence, and a little mischievousness that could only come from someone who had experienced these events first hand.

“It snowed last year too. I made a snowman and my brother knocked it down and I knocked my brother down and then we had tea.” 

And after some events like that, you have a sudden onset of Dylan Thomas' famous lyrical style.

“All the Christmases roll down toward the two-tongued sea, like a cold and headlong moon bundling down the sky that was our street; and they stop at the rim of the ice-edged, fish-freezing waves, and I plunge my hands in the snow and bring out whatever I can find.” 

This is both from the same book!

10: The Other Wise Man by Henry Van Dyke

Tell me this doesn't sound like it was taken from a fantasy novel...

'From his roof he could look over the rising battlements of black and white and crimson and blue and red and silver and gold, to the hill where the summer palace of the Parthian emperors glittered like a jewel in a sevenfold crown. Around the dwelling of Artaban spread a fair garden, a tangle of flowers and fruit-trees, watered by a score of streams descending from the slopes of Mount Orontes, and made musical by innumerable birds. But all colour was lost in the soft and odorous darkness of the late September night, and all sounds were hushed in the deep charm of its silence, save the plashing of the water, like a voice half sobbing and half laughing under the shadows. High above the trees a dim glow of light shone through the curtained arches of the upper chamber, where the master of the house was holding council with his friends. He stood by the doorway to greet his guests—a tall, dark man of about forty years, with brilliant eyes set near together under his broad brow, and firm lines graven around his fine, thin lips; the brow of a dreamer and the mouth of a soldier, a man of sensitive feeling but inflexible will—one of those who, in whatever age they may live, are born for inward conflict and a life of quest. His robe was of pure white wool, thrown over a tunic of silk; and a white, pointed cap, with long lapels at the sides, rested on his flowing black hair. It was the dress of the ancient priesthood of the Magi, called the fire-worshippers.'

But this is all based on historical fact, and so is the majority of this little but I feel it's extremely significant in it's way. Any number of stories strive to become living classics of Christmas on the front of the Santa Claus festival, but this is more like an addendum: an allegorical addition to the story of Jesus and his birth in Bethlehem. 
It's a sumptuous read. I only wish I could write this way because it doesn't have the quality of a historical epic so much as a fairy tale without any magic in the telling. No grand miracles occur on the journey of this forgotten fourth wise man despite his searching for the star in the east. There's no mentions of angels or strange visitations or unbelievable circumstances. Yet it's still a spiritual story that weaves wonder into the mundane, making even the forgotten past with all it's hardships seem to sparkle in the telling.

Van Dyke had this to say about his book.

"I do not know where this little story came from--out of the air, perhaps. One thing is certain, it is not written in any other book, nor is it to be found among the ancient lore of the East. And yet I have never felt as if it were my own. It was a gift, and it seemed to me as if I knew the Giver."—Henry Van Dyke

Henry was a devout Christian, but this isn't like Narnia where he wrote a metaphor to explore his faith. Some people complain about the text rambling some times, but to me it seems more like a man writing a story he's recalling rather than imagining. The little details, the unconventional structure, the conclusion which still manages to be heartwarming and tragic at the same time. 
As a Christian myself it's of interest, but not only as a devotional reading. It's a great character focused adventure, a historical tribute that never once feels dry for the details, a side story to the Biblical account of Christmas everyone already knows which puts that story in a new light, and one of the best written stories it's ever been my joy to read.

---

So what are YOUR favorite Christmas things, eh? ;)
I recently heard that Sony is planning on using their projected Sinister Six movie as a 'soft reboot'. That will bring the total number of Spiderman origin stories (not even counting all the remade origin stories in video games and animated shows) to THREE on screen iterations of the same basic storyline.

Clearly reboots, remakes, prequels and sequels are the big selling point for movie making companies nowadays and as long as they stay successful there's no reason to believe anything changing in terms of priorities.

So instead, why can't we at least do something about making these reboots better? 

Reboots/Remakes aren't just singular projects anymore: they're intended to be tentpoles for entire franchises. Even the upcoming Star Wars movie is supposed to be the launching pad for an entirely new series of films, hence why it isn't usually officially called Episode 7.

The problem is all these projects, all these ideas, all these plans amount to nothing if the original film or film series underperforms. We may never get to see Amazing Spiderman 3 or 4 because despite making a profit, Amazing Spiderman 2 was not a resounding financial success and, going by percentages, the lowest grossing Spiderman film ever made. 
If you can make back billions of dollars but your reboot is STILL considered a flop I'd argue something is fundamentally wrong with your strategy, especially when you decide to green light multiple movies to follow your tentpole film before the box office even comes in.

I predict (unless people are incredibly bored and have nothing better to do) that this same progression of high hopes for a franchise dashed by an underperforming tentpole feature film will be the fate of movies like Terminator Genesys.

What is with the current obsession with erasing the past? I get why the Star Trek reboot basically had to insure that it wouldn't just retread the stories that had come before (even though it totally ended up doing just that anyway) and Terminator basically has to change the timeline since there literally is no history without preventing global nuclear war...but why Star Wars? Why is it that J.J has made no bones about the fact his new film not only ignores cannon, but it sidesteps it? Why is it that Dark Horse comics had to discontinue it's expanded universe because the studio basically declared all those characters, all those stories, all those experiences over decades to be irrelevant compared to the new film? 
Imagine if between Harry Potter books or films there was a revelatory event or character that contradicted everything we'd previously known about the franchise. Short of time travel you'd call this a betrayal of a rich history, an established universe, and something fans had invested a lot of emotional meaning into.
But a TON of movies try to make the 'reboot' all but a declaration that what came before is now meaningless. 
This is especially true of the prequel or sequel nowadays which is odd since these stories supposed FOLLOW from pre-established material. But the tone, the characters, the events of a lot of these new films seem to blithely ignore things that were made perfectly clear or change dramatically to suit whatever the mood is of the current handlers. 
The real reason for ignoring what came before seems to be so the writers/directors can lazily repeat elements of the originals for the sake of empty nostalgia. If you pretend The Lord of the Rings didn't exist maybe the dumber decisions in The Hobbit might make some sense, but in context they're just cloning moments of the previous trilogy with special effects to mask the patch job.
The hypocrisy of all this comes in because these franchises ARE NOT departing from their previous progenitors at all. Without the original Robocop half of the new Robocop movie makes no sense because it's basically a grab-bag of rehashed scenes and ideas. Jokes and callbacks in a lot of movies make no sense because without the context of a series they aren't even related to logic, and reason falls apart.



At a certain point references go from cute to being obnoxious reminders of what COULD be...if they weren't just one off jokes.  Look at all these characters that don't make any sense in context or represent characters and events that you'll probably never get to see on screen!
Yay...? 

Basically the modern reboot labors under a contradiction: an attempt to pull away from the past, but also rip-off the past anyway because those movies were the ones people actually seemed to like.

So how does one make a reboot/remake that people might want to see with more than grudging enthusiasm?

You know what everyone remembers from all of these productions people keep trying to reboot/remake?
The characters.
The problem is that people like these characters I would argue in toto; not just the protagonist because he's played by a (by now) famous actor. Making a younger version of the protagonist doesn't much change the focus of the story, and if you don't do something to distinguish your reboot from the original you can rapidly come across as an inferior immitation (which is what a lot of reboots seem like).

To shake this stigma I suggest the concept of focusing on a character normally left unexplored. I don't mean just have them on screen more often, I mean honestly look into where they came from, how they came to think they way they do and perhaps even what they did before they came into association with the more commonly known main character.
A character used only for exposition or with an utterly detached and meaningless backstory can just be irritating, but it can also be genuinely compelling to look into the history and personality of a seemingly ancillary person who still plays an important role.
This is why the Sherlock Holmes movie (and shows like Sherlock) focused primarily on Watson because although Sherlock is more eccentric and exciting, Watson is more relatable and by comparing him with his friend you realize how off kilter Holmes really is much more effectively than if the film spent most its time with Holmes. Watson is investigated to a certain degree in the original novels, but was never quite the main character so shifting the focus I think made those reboots much more grounded and managed to distinguish them from the decades of portrayals of Sherlock Holmes in the past (which tended to use Watson as just a side kick or comic foil.)

The same could be done with a failed reboot (I'm talking failed in terms of critical reception) like Transformers. Optimus Prime is a potentially interesting character but for the most part although he's competent he's not exactly understandable because of his larger than life heroism and might. Sam Witwikie was intended to be an audience proxy but he comes across as useless and annoying, like so many of the human characters in Transformers who exist just to advance meaningless side plots and tell unfunny jokes.
So? Shift the focus to another transformer!
Lets see the spotlight fall on someone like Ratchet, the autobot medic of the group who almost fades into the background during the films. The other autobots for the most part have been relegated to stereotypes but in addition to making them less formulaic (and in Jazz's case borderline offensive), consider moving the point of view character from pointless Sam to the potentially more interesting robot character who may have similar human-like qualities but he has the advantage of actively being engaged in the main narrative surrounding the robots as opposed to standing in the wings and screaming at people. 
Not everyone cares about Sam or the evil government agents or his continually changing girlfriend. Everyone wanted to see Transformers in a movie called Transformers, so lets make the movie about a Transformer!
In my imagination Ratchet could be torn in his loyalties perhaps (since the war on Cybertron was a civil one) and although not a straight up combatant for the most part he could still do his part for his brothers in the heat of battle. Perhaps there could even be a theme of his position outside of the thick of warfare leading to his attachment with humans that even Optimus cannot focus on when he's dueling Decepticons the size of office buildings. Ratchet could be the bridging character between the autobots and the humans they are supposedly defending: the character everyone wanted to see if humans had to be involved in the story in the first place!

I might not see a movie about the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles AGAIN, but I'd be inclined to see a movie on the origins of Splinter who is established in the comics but there's plenty of wiggle room as to his previous exploits, his formative adventures.
Lets see a Spiderman movie that shifts focus to someone like Black Cat for awhile, not leaving out Spidey but weaving a yarn that associates both characters as equal partners in crime fighting perhaps. A Black Cat movie was rumored but if it turned out anything like the X-Men one-off movies of The Marvel movies like Thor and Captain America it would just be an ultimately purposeless distraction.
I'd prefer to see a movie about a side character that enriched the narrative of the main series rather than confused or contradicted it.

Instead of rebooting 'Judgement Day in Terminator', how about instead we see a tightly made movie about Kyle Reece during his days as a soldier in the resistance? We're sick of John Connor and Sarah already!

How about a Star Wars movie focusing on someone who isn't immediately involved in the same old Light Side vs Dark Side conflict? Maybe a smuggler having adventures or a soldier or a regular person who proves themselves after being caught up in events beyond their usual lives? 
How about a story from the perspective of the villains?

How about a Jurassic Park movie set in a world invaded by the dinosaurs instead of another bloody theme park that inevitable gets destroyed?

If you MUST do a reboot/remake sequel/prequel lets see something new, not just the warmed over scraps of better movies you're serving on a shiny platter. Lets see characters we didn't think we'd see, go places we never thought possible, look at the events of a tale sideways rather than from the same perspective again and again?

Every movie, every story, is a world. You can look outside the lines of the screen if you dare to, and that's where you find events, characters, ideas to freshen your franchise I believe.

Another suggestion...
If you're going to reboot something REBOOT IT!

In the early days of comics before we got stuck in such a rut as we have now people would bend over backwards to come up with new in order to justify bringing back a property or making another parallel story to go with it.
You couldn't just have 'spiderman 2.0' because that would be cheating and people wouldn't buy two comics to follow two stories that weren't all that different.
So instead you had to get fancy.

There are Elseworlds stories in which events occurred differently in the histories or futures of superhero characters and suddenly their entire universes change. Batman becomes a private eye with all his villains as relatively ordinary people but with strange defects like in Dick Tracy. Other series like Red Son sees Superman landing in Russia and becoming the champion of communism with Lex Luther becoming an American president standing against his plans of conquering the world along with a terrorist version of Batman. The Nail series follows the concept of what would happen if a nail burst the tires of Martha and Jonathan Kent so they never managed to discover Superman's crashed space pod, leading to an entire alternate future in which new super heroes rose to take his place but new villains also and the world was put on the brink of destruction.
One series has the super heroes in a world following a nuclear war. Others had zombie super heroes, Batman in victorian times...etc.

These realize that just because you have established characters you want to use doesn't mean you have to CONSTANTLY repeat the same completely rote origin stories again and again. 
Amazing Spiderman I found incredibly dull at times because half of it is telling the same story we already knew with no appreciable changes. Peter is bitten by a magic science spider. WE KNOW. He makes his own web shooters in the reboot but this never comes up in the plot anyway.

We need something different.

Marvel got this too with series like the 2020 line portraying heroes like Spiderman in the far future. Batman Beyond was in a similar vein, proving that just because your heroes age doesn't mean young bucks can't take up the mantle and add their own touches to the legend.

So instead of JUST REPEATING the same origin story again but with slight alterations, give us something new. Unless you're adapting something and if you've decided to reboot it, give us something the past couldn't deliver.

Make Robocop in some way different this time round than his previous nature, and that doesn't just mean giving him a black paint job. 
Make Spiderman 2020 and throw Parker's ancestor into whatever trouble you wanted to involve him in in what might have just been another forgettable modern day Spiderman storyline. Sinister Six in the future? Yes please!

The reboot/remake is going to make it's own changes anyway. You cannot claim to both be faithful to the original and ignore it, so if you're going to be a new property PROVE IT. Don't ride on the coattails of the past if you're going to insult your lineage or have nothing better to prove. 

Lets see a movie I can get excited about instead of just more of the same with a fancy graphical upgrade. I don't care to sit through a movie about a Jurassic Park I've already been to if it's just going to be beat by beat the same movie I've seen before and done better decades ago.

Try and make a THEME. Try and give us characters we like either because you understood why the characters were good in the first place or you made up new ones that have depth and their own personalities. 

Reboots are here to stay it seems.  

Maybe we should start trying to do them right.

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jarredspekter
Dan
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:iconthatnerdwithglasses:
Thatnerdwithglasses Featured By Owner Edited 11 hours ago  Student
can i put you in charge of writing some of my characters from Save Untitled? (in particular Zhirinovsky, General Lebed, and A.L.)
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:iconedthesupersaiyan:
edthesupersaiyan Featured By Owner 12 hours ago  Hobbyist Writer
you ever played star wars: battlefront 1 or 2? I played the crap out of 2 as a kid :D
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:iconthatnerdwithglasses:
Thatnerdwithglasses Featured By Owner 11 hours ago  Student
god, i must have wasted soo much homework time playing those games XD

got the game on PC (had to mod the crap out of it to get it running properly)
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:iconthatnerdwithglasses:
Thatnerdwithglasses Featured By Owner 12 hours ago  Student
huh Obama made hos state of the union address and you haven't made a commentary/satire of it...you must really be calm lately
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:iconsonicrocks57:
sonicrocks57 Featured By Owner 15 hours ago
Do you think that overthinking something is possible?
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:iconedthesupersaiyan:
edthesupersaiyan Featured By Owner 21 hours ago  Hobbyist Writer
do you watch "some jerk with a camera"?
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:iconedthesupersaiyan:
edthesupersaiyan Featured By Owner 22 hours ago  Hobbyist Writer
sorry if I haven't used your request done for me as the cover art for my story, the image system on fanfiction.net sucks
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:iconthatnerdwithglasses:
Thatnerdwithglasses Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Student
The next sonic game's gimmick is create-a-character

How happy/sad/mad/annoyed/indifferent would you be
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:iconthatnerdwithglasses:
Thatnerdwithglasses Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Student
What do you think of Hatsune Miku?
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:iconthatnerdwithglasses:
Thatnerdwithglasses Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Student
what do you thing of freedom planet?
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